Hawaiian Casting Games

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54. Nou-nou-pu-ni-u - Cocoanut-Shell CASTING

Coconut Treet

[Page 227] A cocoanut is hollowed out and suspended by a cord, and the players throw at it with balls made of kapa. One acts as banker, and pays a prize to a player who hits the cocoanut a certain proportional number of times.

80. Ki-o-la-o-la-le-na - Ring CASTING

Ring Casting

[Page 239] A game of casting iron rings over a small stake or pin. The rings are about an inch in interior diameter. Four men play, each with ten rings. The one who puts the most rings on the pin wins the prize. On the birthday of King Kamehameha I, rings made of sections of cocoanut shell (le-na-ni-u), wrapped with kapa to prevent their breaking, are used in a similar game, in accordance with old custom. My informants state that stone rings also were anciently used.

62. Ki-o-la-o-la-la-au - Stick CASTING or "Tip Cat"

Tip Cat [Page 230] Tip cat is played with two sticks made of ko-a wood, one about 6 inches in length (la-au po-ko-le, "short stick ") placed so that its ends rest on the edges of a small hole scooped in the ground, and the other the bat (la-au hi-li, "striking stick," or la-au la-i-hi, "long stick"), which is longer. The cat is tossed by thrusting the bat beneath it and striking it in the air. The distance it falls is measured with the bat, and the one who thus first counts one hundred wins the game. The game is also called pa-a-ni la-au, from pa-a-ni, "to play," and la-au, "wood." Stair (Page 139) refers to "the English schoolboy's game of cat, but played in the water instead of on the land," as among the games of the Samoans.

Last update February 2, 2010